Prickly acacia (Acacia nilotica subsp. indica) is one of northern Australia's worst weeds. It is a woody shrub/tree that aggressively replaces grasslands with thorny thickets. It costs primary production over $5 million per annum by decreasing pasture production and...
Details for a strategic plan aiming to confine and minimalise prickly acacia.
An article from the 31st volume of the Journal of Natural History, written in 1997 by M.L. Cox.
A report written in 2006 for the Australian Journal of Entomology 45 by K. Dhileepan, K .A.D. Wilmot Senaratne and S.Raghu.
Part 2 of a booklet focused on Prickly Acacia, published in 2004.
The conversion of grasslands and savannas to shrublands and woodlands by invasive weeds is a global problem confounding scientists and land managers. Since the 1960s, prickly acacia, Acacia nilotica ssp.indica, has substantially increased in density and range to become one of...
1.Acacia nilotica is a spinescent woody legume that has become highly invasive in several parts of the world, including Australia where it has been declared a weed of national significance. Understanding the likely potential distribution of this notorious plant under current and...
Worldwide, invasive weeds threaten agricultural, natural and urban ecosystems. In Australia's agricultural and grazing regions, invasive species often establish across extensive areas where weed management is hampered by an inability to detect the location and timing of an...
Prickly acacia, Acacia nilotica ssp. indica, a major weed of the Mitchell Grass Downs of northern Queensland, has been the target of biological control projects since the 1980s. The striped leaf-feeding beetle, Homichloda barkeri (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Alticinae), was the...
Part of the Pest Status Review Series - Land Protection Branch. Assessment team: M. Barker W. Dorney P. James P. Jeffrey N. March J. Marohasy D. Panetta
Prickly acacia, Acacia nilotica subsp. indica (Benth.) Brenan, a major weed of the Mitchell Grass Downs of northern Queensland, Australia, has been the target of biological control projects since the 1980s. The leaf-feeding caterpillar Cometaster pyrula (Hopffer) was collected...
Two geometrid moths Chiasmia inconspicua and Chiasmia assimilis, identified as potential biological control agents for prickly acacia Acacia nilotica subsp. indica, were collected in Kenya and imported into quarantine facilities in Australia where laboratory cultures were...

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Queensland Government

RLF Programme

National Landcare Programme