A national strategy for the management of vertebrate pest animals in Australia Natural Resource
The 41 partners in the Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre are proud to promote the forthcoming products developed or registered throughout their seven year funding life (2005-2012). All products have been developed with animal welfare, price, useability, target...
Rabbits are one of Australia's major environmental and agricultural pests. They cause major losses of native vegetation, compete with native fauna and domestic livestock and are the major food source for foxes and cats. Their environmental and economic impacts are estimated...
Details of the management strategy developed for use in regards the management of rabbits as devised and implemented by Queensland from the year 2001 to the year 2006.
Part of a series of information pamphlets published in 2004 by the Australian Department of the Environment and Heritage.
We used a predator removal experiment to examine the role of red fox (Vulpes vulpes) predation in suppressing rabbit (Oyctolagus ctrniculus) population growth in Namadgi National Park in southeastern Australia. At 2 sites, fox abundance was reduced with a 1080 poisoning campaign...
Release of virulent myxoma virus has been a key component of rabbit-control operations in Queensland, Australia, since the 1960s but its use rests on anecdotal reports. During a routine operation to release virulentmyxoma virus we found no evidence to support the continued...
Rabbit populations and demography were surveyed at Roxby Downs in arid South Australia from 1989 to 1997. Rabbit numbers typically peaked in late summer following breeding from late winter to early summer. After initial declines attributable to burrow flooding and increased...
A series of simulated rabbit poisoning trials was camed out to assess the acceptance of carrot, pellet (extruded pollard and bran) and oat baits by non-target species. The results showed that a high percentage of those non-target mammals exposed to the baits ingested at least...
A year 2000 article from Ecos 105, October-December.
Shortage of water in natural pastures led to a sharp decline in a large rabbit population in arid, northeastern South Australia. The pastures were dry and some rabbits drank at springs and water troughs. Further from water, rabbitsdimbed trees and shrubs to obtain succulent...
The age-structures of rabbit populations at four climatically different sites in South Australia have altered significantly since the introduction of European rabbit fleas; in summer the ratio of young of the year to older rabbits has been greatly reduced. There is evidence of...

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Queensland Government

RLF Programme

National Landcare Programme